Press Release

#DanceLikeaDad Encourages Dads to Dance Their Way into the Hearts of Their Most Important Audience—Their Kids

New Campaign with Ad Council and The U.S. Department of Health & Human Services’ Administration for Children and Families Highlights the Importance of Small Moments Shared Between Dads and Their Children

WASHINGTON, DC (JUNE 11, 2019) – Today, as dads everywhere are preparing to be celebrated for Father’s Day, a new campaign launches to showcase the big wins that come from small moments shared between fathers and their children. Created in partnership between The U.S. Department of Health and Human Services’ Administration for Children and Families (ACF), along with the National Responsible Fatherhood Clearinghouse, Ad Council and Campbell Ewald, the campaign shows that nothing is better than dads and their kids sharing a moment and dancing together. When dads take time to #DanceLikeADad with their kids, that small moment can make a lasting impact.

About 1 out of every 2 working dads (48%) say they spend too little time with their kids and want to do a better job at parenting.[1] Children who feel close to their fathers exhibit better cognitive and social functioning, including increased self-control, self-esteem and empathy.[2] Overall, having an involved father significantly contributes to happier and healthier children; and this is true whether the father lives with his child or not.[3]

The campaign tagline “Make a moment. Dance Like a Dad” is part of an ongoing effort to encourage dads to play an active role in their children’s lives. Fathers and children are featured in the TV spots dancing with and alongside each other to communicate that the smallest moments spent with their children can make the biggest difference.

“The goal of this campaign is to inspire fathers to find fun and easy ways of spending quality time with their children. It’s often the simplest moments that children cherish most with their fathers,” said Clarence H. Carter, Director of ACF’s Office of Family Assistance. “We’re so excited for this campaign to launch. It’s our hope that our ‘Dance Like a Dad’ campaign will inspire dads everywhere to have a positive impact on their children’s lives by continuing to dance their way into their hearts.”

“When dads take time out of their day to have a little fun with their kids, the effects are so much more meaningful than most people think,” said Ad Council President and CEO Lisa Sherman. “We’re thrilled to be launching this new campaign and hope it shows dads everywhere that they can make a big impact on their kids’ lives through simple, fun, and even silly ways.”

"Studies have shown that kids that have involved dads in their lives are healthier, do better in school, and are generally just happier kids. That's why this year's campaign urges dads to cut a rug, bust a move, or just plain jump around with their kids and dance like a dad" said Joe Shoesmith, Chief Creative Officer from Campbell Ewald.

Since the Responsible Fatherhood campaign was first introduced in 2006, it has secured over $402.7 million in donated media and formed partnerships with the likes of NASCAR, WWE, and Sony Pictures. According to the Ad Council’s tracking study, two-thirds of fathers in the US report having heard or seen at least one of the campaign’s public service announcements (PSAs) (68%). Those who are aware of the campaign PSAs are significantly more likely to help their children with homework (70% vs. 53%) and read to their child (56% vs. 34%) compared to those who are unaware of the campaign. Fathers are directed to Fatherhood.gov where users will find helpful tips, tools, and information to help them get more involved with their kids. 

“This new campaign is an opportunity to see dads engaging with their kids in a carefree and fun way,” said Kenneth Braswell, Project Director for the National Responsible Fatherhood Clearinghouse and Chief Executive Officer for Fathers Incorporated. “This, above all else, highlights that it’s the lighthearted and memorable moments that are most important in cultivating a strong father-child relationship. It brings to life what research has been pointing to for years: Dads today want to be more involved than ever.

“Father’s Day is a holiday where we come out to honor dads. However, fathers should be honored year-round because it’s clear that when father’s show up for their kids consistently, those children and families flourish.”

Stay connected with the campaign via social media on Facebook and Twitter. For more information or to access additional resources, visit www.fatherhood.gov.

###

 

ABOUT THE NATIONAL RESPONSIBLE FATHERHOOD CLEARINGHOUSE (NRFC)

The National Responsible Fatherhood Clearinghouse (NRFC) is funded by the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services’ (HHS’) Administration for Children and Families’ (ACF’s) Office of Family Assistance (OFA) to assist policymakers, practitioners, and fathers to promote and support responsible fatherhood. NRFC provides evidence-informed materials, resources, and tools including timely information on fatherhood issues, and access to print and electronic publications.

ABOUT THE ADMINISTRATION FOR CHILDREN AND FAMILIES (ACF)

ACF supports programs that focus on responsible fatherhood, such as the Responsible Fatherhood grant program administered by the Office of Family Assistance (OFA). OFA currently funds 40 organizations across the United States to provide Responsible Fatherhood activities. New Pathways for Fathers and Families and Responsible Fatherhood Opportunities for Reentry and Mobility (ReFORM) demonstration grants are used to:

  • strengthen positive father-child engagement
  • improve employment and economic mobility opportunities; and
  • improve healthy relationships(including couple and co-parenting) and marriage.

These programs are part of ACF’s community-based efforts to promote strong, healthy family formation and maintenance, responsible fatherhood and parenting, and reentry opportunities for fathers returning from incarceration.

ABOUT THE U.S. DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (HHS)

HHS supports responsible fatherhood in diverse ways. Because engaged fathers strengthen families and contribute to healthy outcomes for children, many HHS programs integrate support for fathers. These include Head Start, child support programs, and Temporary Assistance for Needy Families. 

ABOUT THE AD COUNCIL

The Ad Council brings together the most creative minds in advertising and media to address the most worthy causes. Its innovative, pro bono social good campaigns raise awareness. They inspire action. They save lives. To learn more, visit AdCouncil.org follow the Ad Council’s communities on Facebook and Twitter, and view the creative on YouTube.

ABOUT CAMBELL-EWALD

Campbell Ewald is a U.S.-based full service, fully integrated advertising and marketing communications agency with over 100 years of know how. The agency provides both traditional and specialized capabilities including advertising; insights and strategic planning; creative development; integrated content strategy and creation; CRM; media planning and buying; in-house production; and analytics. With offices in Detroit, Los Angeles and New York, Campbell Ewald has been recognized as one of Metropolitan Detroit’s Best and Brightest Companies to Work For and one of the top 10 agencies in North America by the Warc 100. The agency’s work on behalf of clients has been honored by, among others, the Cannes International Advertising Festival, the Effies, the OneShow, the AAF Mosaic Awards, the ECHO Awards and ADWEEK.

###

Press Contact:

Ad Council

Emily Kostic

ekostic@adcouncil.org

212-984-1910

[1] PEW Research Center (2015). Among working parents, fathers more conflicted about time spent with kids. Available at: https://www.pewresearch.org/fact-tank/2015/04/01/working-mom-guilt-many-dads-feel-it-too/ft_15-04-01_workingdadsconflicted/

[2] The Fathering Research Project. Available at: https://thefatheringproject.org/research/fathering-research/

[3] Rosenberg, J. & Wilcox, W. B. (2006). The importance of fathers in the healthy development of children. Available at: https://www.childwelfare.gov/pubpdfs/fatherhood.pdf

Help us improve this site!
Take our quick survey.

Ad Council Family of Sites