Recycling

Recycling

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  • TV

    Recycling - Journey :60

    http://www.IWantToBeRecycled.orgThe Recycling campaign, sponsored by Keep America Beautiful, aims to reinvigorate the recycling brand. The campaign aims to generate awareness, explain how and where to recycle, mobilize individual ownership and emotional connection to recycling through community building, and transform recycling into a daily social norm. The campaign shows consumers that their recyclable materials want to be something more, and promotes recycling as a way to give garbage another life. In "Journey", a plastic bottle refuses to settle for being just a bottle and recognizes its dream in a coast-to-coast journey after being recycled.

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  • TV

    Recycling - Stadium :15

    http://www.IWantToBeRecycled.orgThe Recycling campaign, sponsored by Keep America Beautiful, aims to reinvigorate the recycling brand. The campaign aims to generate awareness, explain how and where to recycle, mobilize individual ownership and emotional connection to recycling through community building, and transform recycling into a daily social norm. The campaign shows consumers that their recyclable materials want to be something more, and promotes recycling as a way to give garbage another life. In "Stadium," aluminum cans everywhere can dream to become something bigger and better after being recycled. The PSA was filmed on location at M&T Bank Stadium, which is home to the NFL's Baltimore Ravens. The stadium's exterior, and additional select areas throughout the venue, is constructed partially from post-consumer recycled aluminum.

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  • Bench - Recycling
    Outdoor

    Bench - Recycling

    Bench - Recycling
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  • Radio

    I want to be - Recycling

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  • Recycling - Super Sorter Game
    Web

    Recycling - Super Sorter Game

    Recycling - Super Sorter Game

    Super Sorter is an interactive game on IWantToBeRecycled.org where users can see recycled items' journeys before they become something new. Play the game, and see if you're a Super Sorter!

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≈251 million tons of trash were generated in the US in 2012

Overview

By 2012, recycling programs existed in about 60 percent of American communities; yet recycling rates were still surprisingly low.

In fact, only 34.5 percent of the 251 million tons of trash Americans generated that year was recycled or composted. And in an Ad Council survey, 62 percent of Americans admitted they were not avid recyclers.

To improve these rates, the Ad Council teamed up with Keep America Beautiful and San Francisco-based ad agency Pereira & O’Dell to launch the I Want To Be Recycled campaign. This playful–and powerful–campaign personifies everyday recyclable objects, allowing plastic bottles, steel cans and more to share their dreams of a different life. 

For example, in one PSA, a plastic bottle dreams of seeing the ocean, only to later become a plastic bench overlooking the water. In an outdoor ad, a steel can confesses it wants to be a bike. An interactive game, Super Sorter, at the campaign website showcases recycled items' journeys to becoming something new.

“This campaign is the emotional push needed to raise awareness and positively change people’s behavior to recycle more. Our intent is to increase recycling rates,which translates into measurable benefits including waste reduction, energy savings, natural resource conservation and job creation,” said Brenda Pulley, Keep America Beautiful senior vice president. “Based on survey feedback, we know people want to recycle. This campaign is designed to tap into that desire as well as provide helpful tools to make recycling easier.”

Indeed, visitors to the campaign website can access many tools to learn more about becoming better recyclers. They can locate nearby recycling facilities, learn to separate recycling facts from myths, and easily share information with their social communities on Twitter and Facebook

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